Posted tagged ‘social networks’

How do you feel about digital memories?

September 14, 2009

digital ageListening the OnPoint, the topic is whether it is possible to create a “total recall” for all our memories of our lives. With all the social networks like Twitter and Facebook–not to mention the plethora of others–should we as human beings be recording all the minutiae of our lives to be retrieved at a later time?

Should we supplement our memory with the digital gadgets like cell phones, iPods, social networks or other aids?

Is there anything to the argument that the more you memorize, the more ability you have to memorize other things in the future? With children, it’s clear that the more you stress their brain with input of classical music or shapes/colors, the smarter the child will become and the faster her brain will be able to process new input.

What do you think? Should we record things that we don’t “need” to remember in our lives?

Let me hear your four seconds!

September 2, 2009

How many times have you answered the phone and some telemarketer spends the first 30 seconds not taking a breath or allowing you to get a word in edgewise? Chances are, more often than not.

Experts say that we, the business professionals of the world, have a total of four–count ’em–four seconds to entice someone into doing business with you or buying whatever product you happen to be hawking.

Did you get that? You have to say something in the first four seconds of your conversation which will make someone decide if they are going to work with you. If you haven’t got them in four seconds, it’s time to move on to someone else.

I know I need to work on my pitch, and I’m having a hard time finding others who really know how to effectively pitch to prospects. If you’ve got a good pitch, let me hear it. If your pitch needs a little work, let me hear that, too, and we can offer hints or ways to improve.

Remember, YOU only have FOUR free seconds before someone tunes you out and starts playing computer games, so make ’em good.

How ’bout it?

Readjusting My Goals…

May 28, 2009

linkedin1If you’ve been reading my recent posts, you may have noticed that I have made the statement that I will begin affecting change in my life by becoming accountable to YOU, the blogosphere.

Well, I started out pretty well, but then it sort of lost the appeal as I was a bit uncertain as to the actual number of people who were reading my posts. Hmm….

However, I have found renewed inspiration and am working now on some new goals which I will share with you as I become comfortable with the idea of letting the world (or the couple dozen people who click on my posts) know what my plans are.

But what I do want to tell you is this: I’m trying to become more active on LinkedIn and am always looking to make new connections. If you are interested in connecting with me, my email address is in the “ABOUT” page on my blog. However, if it appears that I’m getting tremendous amounts of spam to my inbox, I will then take action and remove it.

Are you trying out new things in your business? If so, I’d love to hear about them!

How ’bout it?

Accountability: Becoming the person you want to become

May 7, 2009

AccountabilityIn starting this recent chapter of my blog, I decided to create some sort of accountability which would hopefully “encourage” me to write on a more regular basis. Each week, I’m making a (seemingly) feasible goal of action.

This week, I have aspired to make contact with people in the mainstream (traditional) media, since I’m working to become the next generation of “new” media. So far this week, I have endeavored to for connections with 15 people from Facebook who work for CBS. Several have responded, but the rest have either ignored my friend request or haven’t taken action. Should I move on with others, or should I keep asking those who haven’t replied?

My second goal from my last post was to become more accountable by making more frequent blog posts. That’s an easy one. By doing just this, I’ve taken action to make it happen.

My third goal is to use my time more wisely: I accomplished this goal by implementing the use of a timer when using online aps on Facebook.

A friend sent me this Youtube video which I found sadly true and a bit amusing:

After watching it, I started making a list of my goals for next week:

  1. I need to have a business plan, something to fall back on when I get into a funk. I have never written a business plan, but I understand that by writing others’ business plans, it can be very lucrative, but first I want to have one of my own. Any advice from those who are more seasoned in business than I would be much appreciated.
  2. I intend to continue making connections in the traditional media.
  3. I will begin/continue trying to sell my services and those of others via social networks and the Relationship Economy.

How ’bout it?

Keeping Me Accountable

April 30, 2009

One of my latest posts stated that I was going to chronicle change in my life. And to do this, I thought I could use some accountability partners — some people to say, what happened? Why didn’t you post? Why didn’t you do what you said you would.

Well, more than a week has gone by, and I’m just now making the first of my accountability posts. Truth be told, I’ve kind of been neglecting my blog because I fell a little short when reaching the goals I set last week.

As a reminder, here are the goals I made:

  1. I intend to begin to chronicle change.
  2. I intend to establish more connections on social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn) with people who are involved in media.
  3. I intend to become more active in activities which will prove to be effective in my goal to show people the benefits of social networks for business.

Time to face the music.

  • With these posts, I did, in fact, begin to chronicle change. I had initially hoped I would make more frequent posts than once or twice a week, but unfortunately, I was either too busy or distracted to make more posts happen. Maybe next week.
  • My second goal from last week was to make connections with other people who are in traditional media. I failed to do this at all. I don’t know what happened to me, but I just felt like I lacked the energy to connect with others who could help me either bring business or other connections to people who are in the positions which could establish me as a prominent businessman. So that one will be on the list again.
  • The third and final goal I made last week was to become more active in activities which proved beneficial to my ultimate goal of showing the world how advantageous social networks were for business. For this one, I did fairly well, but I still found myself going to applications in Facebook which devoured HOURS of my time and energy. However, I have made a point to make calls to business people who are in positions to hire me.

How do you think I did? I can go through my lists and give myself a point value, but I realize that what I’m asking for is forĀ  contributions! On a scale of 0 – 10, with 0 being not at all and 10 being remarkable work, how do you think I did?

I intend to make more goals and post them on Monday, May 4.

How ’bout it?

Is Twitter Subjugating Social Networking

March 13, 2009

twitter_logoFor quite some time, people have been all a-twitter about twitter. I thinkĀ  I read that somewhere but don’t remember where. At a men’s retreat with my church, someone named Bob asked me what Twitter was all about. As I searched my mind for a clearly-defined advantaage provided by Twitter and NOT by other social networks, it kind of got me thinking Bob’s question.

What is it REALLY?

Bob said that he heard Twitter is “sort of the younger generation’s Facebook.” Well, in a sense, it is true that fewer retirement-age people are on Twitter. However, as Paull Young said in his Fox Business interview at Happy Hour, the social networks transcend all generational barriers. What is really key to the social networks is what it is that compels people to be there in the first place.

On Facebook, there are groups for members to join and causes which can be championed. And the common thread between all the social networks is the common interest held by the members. For instance, MySpace is typically thought to be used by not only the younger crowd, but by people who have an interest in music. MySpace is supposed to have a better interface with which musicians can showcase their work. I’m not a musician, and I have not experience with placing my songs (or anyone else’s) on a social network.

Based on that school of thought, one can assume that the common interest among members of MySpace is music. For the members of Facebook, interests are range widely. From countries, to cities, to places of work, the list of common interests continues to grow as people find their own areas of expertise. Why is this such a big deal? Because it is the common interests of members from all over the world.

Does Twitter Really Compete?

With the “micro-blogs” of 140 characters on Twitter, can we really get to know one another well enough to develop a relationship? Or even to begin to build a reputation or earn trust? Twitter allows the posting of “Tinyurls” which provide links to posts, sites or articles of interest to us. By clicking the tinyurl, we can go immediately to the page which may or may not be written by the person whom we “follow.”

Ben Yoskovitz, of Instigator Blog, breaks down the pluses and minuses of Twitter, but he comes back to the importance of having a blog in which one can showcase his/her expertise and develop more thought than he can in Twitter.

So what are your thoughts about the importance of Blogging as opposed to Tweeting? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

How ’bout it?

Really Good Interview on Fox Business

March 12, 2009

On Sta.rtUp.biz, one of the plethora of social networks for business people, I started listening to an interview with Social Networking Strategist, Paul Young from Conversion, a social media marketing firm.

The Key to Networking Effectively:

Over 70 percent of teens in the US are on some sort of social networking site. But those networks are not just for teens or kids anymore, Young says. Recently, I found an article online titled “Grandpa’s now on Facebook” where the author really gets quite real about how weird it made him feel for “gramps” to be “checking up on him.”

And although it may cause a little discomfort at Thanksgiving around the table, but it’s true: the internet is being embraced by people from all generations. This means that advertisers aren’t going to be able to be selective about their target audiences based on age. The lines are graying between teens and twenty-somethings, thirty-somethings and on up to (and past) retirement age.

The second point Paul brings up is that the first thing you (as an advertiser) should do is get into the social network and listen. Just find out what it is that the community is talking about, what they are doing, where they spend most of their time. The internet is divided into groups or niches in which the members don’t share anything in common except one or two common interests.

Another point Paul makes is that in order to become effective and affective, you need to provide content to help other members.

“it’s really about altruism and enhancing the community with your brand,” Paul said.

Traditional Approaches Don’t Work

The traditional approach used to be, “Here, listen to my message. Enjoy!” Paul says that approach won’t work in the social networking space. It really goes back to altruism, he says.

You need to get in there and find out what your community is talking about, what are they interested in, and how can you enhace that? Sadly, most people in the business-world know what they want to do, but they are so stuck in the mindset of the traditional advertising gurus that they don’t really understand what they need to be doing in the world of social networking to bring in dollars to their companies…

The world of marketing within the social networks is quickly becoming the newest and largest cash-cow the nation and world has ever seen!

How ’bout it?