Posted tagged ‘communications factors’

How do you feel about digital memories?

September 14, 2009

digital ageListening the OnPoint, the topic is whether it is possible to create a “total recall” for all our memories of our lives. With all the social networks like Twitter and Facebook–not to mention the plethora of others–should we as human beings be recording all the minutiae of our lives to be retrieved at a later time?

Should we supplement our memory with the digital gadgets like cell phones, iPods, social networks or other aids?

Is there anything to the argument that the more you memorize, the more ability you have to memorize other things in the future? With children, it’s clear that the more you stress their brain with input of classical music or shapes/colors, the smarter the child will become and the faster her brain will be able to process new input.

What do you think? Should we record things that we don’t “need” to remember in our lives?

Let me hear your four seconds!

September 2, 2009

How many times have you answered the phone and some telemarketer spends the first 30 seconds not taking a breath or allowing you to get a word in edgewise? Chances are, more often than not.

Experts say that we, the business professionals of the world, have a total of four–count ’em–four seconds to entice someone into doing business with you or buying whatever product you happen to be hawking.

Did you get that? You have to say something in the first four seconds of your conversation which will make someone decide if they are going to work with you. If you haven’t got them in four seconds, it’s time to move on to someone else.

I know I need to work on my pitch, and I’m having a hard time finding others who really know how to effectively pitch to prospects. If you’ve got a good pitch, let me hear it. If your pitch needs a little work, let me hear that, too, and we can offer hints or ways to improve.

Remember, YOU only have FOUR free seconds before someone tunes you out and starts playing computer games, so make ’em good.

How ’bout it?

It’s Summertime! Less Time Than Before.

June 8, 2009

tre-coverFor the past couple of weeks and probably for the next couple, we have been out-of-pocket–traveling to graduations and other family-related events. For this reason (and others we will keep to ourselves) I have failed to post frequently to this blog. (That’s my confession.)

However, I have been quite busy out in the real world and on LinkedIn making connections to people who can potentially provide me business. So I’ve been active.

Feel free to contact us at On the Mark Writing if you or your company need a well-written press release, a carefully-crafted press kit, marketing collateral, or editing services.

In this down economy, if you are unsure of the process of writing news releases or marketing collateral (i.e. sales letters) why not get a professional writer to create them for you? News releases are an excellent way to get people to talk about your business and subsequently driving traffic to your website. The key is conversations. If you create a dialogue between your business and your customers or clients, ultimate those conversations will create revenue in your pocket.

How ’bout it?

Readjusting My Goals…

May 28, 2009

linkedin1If you’ve been reading my recent posts, you may have noticed that I have made the statement that I will begin affecting change in my life by becoming accountable to YOU, the blogosphere.

Well, I started out pretty well, but then it sort of lost the appeal as I was a bit uncertain as to the actual number of people who were reading my posts. Hmm….

However, I have found renewed inspiration and am working now on some new goals which I will share with you as I become comfortable with the idea of letting the world (or the couple dozen people who click on my posts) know what my plans are.

But what I do want to tell you is this: I’m trying to become more active on LinkedIn and am always looking to make new connections. If you are interested in connecting with me, my email address is in the “ABOUT” page on my blog. However, if it appears that I’m getting tremendous amounts of spam to my inbox, I will then take action and remove it.

Are you trying out new things in your business? If so, I’d love to hear about them!

How ’bout it?

The Communications Factors: Making Them Work For You

October 11, 2007

The Communications Factors affect each and every person on the planet. No matter what language he speaks or where he lives, something must be communicated. We are a social people, and therefore we must communicate our wants, needs, intentions, and thoughts to others in our society.

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Web 2.0 has brought people all around the globe together, thereby making them all members in one community. Web 2.0 has brought an end to the established media giants providing the news to us in a pre-packaged format. With the technology advances, such as YouTube and Wikipaedia, we, the people, are able to not only view the news, but also create the news. We are the ones who are providing photos and videos of events. And we are giving descriptions from our perspective of those events.

Paul Graham explores the “democracy” of Web 2.0, explaining it this way:

The most dramatic example of Web 2.0 democracy is not in the selection of ideas, but their production. I’ve noticed for a while that the stuff I read on individual people’s sites is as good as or better than the stuff I read in newspapers and magazines. And now I have independent evidence: the top links on Reddit are generally links to individual people’s sites rather than to magazine articles or news stories.

With the role of people in the creation of news, how can anyone ignore the Communication Factors? Just like Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said, if someone at a party tells you of a great pediatrician, you’re going to check with friends and then probably change doctors. Zuckerberg wants Facebook to be like that, only faster and more pervasive.

With information coming at us at astounding speeds, shouldn’t we perfect the means of communication we use, whether it’s writing, blogging, emailing, podcasting, participating in social networks, whatever? The best networkers, and for that matter, businessmen, are the ones who can become the early-adopters of new technology, enabling them to get in on the ground floor of such ventures as Google or Facebook. Not only do they adapt easily and early to new technology, but they also work to improve themselves with its use!

How ’bout it?

The Communications Factors: Do It Better!

October 9, 2007

Just like with anything else, managing the Communications Factors improves with time and practice. The same way a child who’s played soccer for a couple of seasons is better than the first timer, the more we employ the Communications Factors, the better we are at getting our message to the intended audience with little or no distraction or interference.

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In the Relationship Economy, communicating with others requires a good amount of time and skill. If you deny this fact, just take a look at some of the meaningless, trivial blogs which are usually – but not always – written by teens. “Just stopping by to say hi,” seems to be a common post to many MySpace pages. Blogger Deborah Schultz said in her July 10th post this year, “Relationships take work.  We all know this and yet we take shortcuts,  in our personal and professional lives.” Yes, relationships do take work. Think about friendships among children. When two kids approximately the same age spend a half hour playing and really enjoying themselves, they each have made a “new best friend.” However, later that week, one child cannot even remember the other’s name. It’s all about the relationship.

The relationships of the physical world are becoming more and more virtual. And the most effective ways to build those relationships is to communicate, via technology, with others in the on-line world.

By engaging the technologies of communications (i.e. practice), we learn to improve the transference of information. The more time we spend using those emerging technologies, the better we become at maintaining those relationships which really matter most to us. As it is said, “Practice makes perfect!”

The more you do anything, whether it’s posting to a blog, establishing yourself as an expert or producing a podcast, the more you do it, the better will will get.

The technologies provide us ways with which we can communicate; how and whether we use the technology is completely up to us.

How ’bout it?

The Communications Factors: Biz Writing

October 5, 2007

I got an email this morning regarding the tips on writing for business. I agree with the majority of the article. The main point was that in order to write an effective business letter or email, the writer needs to keep it short and sweet. I will never forget what one of my journalism professors said: “Words are expensive.” He was referring to the importance of being able to take a story of 1000 words and edit it down to 800 without losing any of the meaning. I guess that’s why I strive for concise words which convey a powerful meaning.

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The first point of the article was that the writer should abstain from “unfamiliar” words. The examples given were ascertain, consummate, and peruse. Certainly one should shy away from those words in a business letter, but I don’t think they are necessarily “unfamiliar.” Remember, when writing to a group of businessmen or women, just because you don’t pull out all the stops of your command of the English language doesn’t mean that you are writing as though your audience is composed of idiots. In fact, my mentor, Jay Deragon, has a powerful presence in the Relationship Economy and is probably smarter than I am, but reading his blog posts is sometimes painful. My strength is being able to write clear and concise text; Jay’s strength is having the ability to grasp complex, abstract strategies and implement them into the emerging technologies of this world.

Many of those who commented on the article disagree. They said to refrain from “unfamiliar” and long words was to “dumb down” the English language. However, I believe there is a time and place for the display of your inherent sesquipedalian qualities. There is nothing which loses readers, thereby decreasing your “stickiness” on the ‘net, faster than having to find a dictionary to look up an unfamiliar word. The time to employ erudite, tedious loquacity is college entrance essays, not in business correspondence. Many of the MBAs of the world have excellent vocabularies but don’t use them because they are not out to impress anyone. It does, however, impress people when you are able to convey a complex subject without unnecessary use of commas, or words which might give pause to the reader.

If the writer doesn’t restrain himself from utilizing grandiose verbiage and punctuation, then, he is drawing attention to his inexperience or his over-elevated sense of self-importance. The most dire consequence is for the reader to think, “What a pompous ass!”

I will continue on this vein in future posts.

How ’bout it?