The Communications Factors: Do It Better!

Just like with anything else, managing the Communications Factors improves with time and practice. The same way a child who’s played soccer for a couple of seasons is better than the first timer, the more we employ the Communications Factors, the better we are at getting our message to the intended audience with little or no distraction or interference.

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In the Relationship Economy, communicating with others requires a good amount of time and skill. If you deny this fact, just take a look at some of the meaningless, trivial blogs which are usually – but not always – written by teens. “Just stopping by to say hi,” seems to be a common post to many MySpace pages. Blogger Deborah Schultz said in her July 10th post this year, “Relationships take work.  We all know this and yet we take shortcuts,  in our personal and professional lives.” Yes, relationships do take work. Think about friendships among children. When two kids approximately the same age spend a half hour playing and really enjoying themselves, they each have made a “new best friend.” However, later that week, one child cannot even remember the other’s name. It’s all about the relationship.

The relationships of the physical world are becoming more and more virtual. And the most effective ways to build those relationships is to communicate, via technology, with others in the on-line world.

By engaging the technologies of communications (i.e. practice), we learn to improve the transference of information. The more time we spend using those emerging technologies, the better we become at maintaining those relationships which really matter most to us. As it is said, “Practice makes perfect!”

The more you do anything, whether it’s posting to a blog, establishing yourself as an expert or producing a podcast, the more you do it, the better will will get.

The technologies provide us ways with which we can communicate; how and whether we use the technology is completely up to us.

How ’bout it?

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Explore posts in the same categories: grammar, networking, relationship economy, social networking

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