The Communications Factors. When is it? (cont…)

As I stated in yesterday’s post, the Communications Factors influence our behavior all the time. Sending an email to one person, or even a group of people, cannot compare to the effectiveness and efficiency of the blog. And beyond blogging, posting to a social networking board, like Facebook, Link to Your World, or my favorite, Link to Nashville, vastly increases the size of the audience you reach with your message.

As I reported in yesterday’s post, posting videos to the internet is becoming easier and cheaper to do than ever before, thereby increasing your reach to a global audience. But there are still other things you can do to disseminate your message even more widely.

  • First is signing up for Technorati (Tech – no – RÄ – tē). By doing this, you enable yourself to receive greater exposure from search engines and just casual blog-surfers.
  • Second is to make yourself “sticky.” Get readers to visit your blog or your site, read it to the end, and then come back either an hour later or the next day to learn what kinds of insights you have. Your readers want to know what you will give them for free on your blog or network. What value can you offer others to entice them into joining your network or providing traffic to your site? By maintaining relationship in this Relationship Economy, you are establishing yourself as the expert in your field – whatever it is! And once you do acquire the expert status, you can create more and better connections with more people who are even better informed and connected than you!

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But the keys to forming those relationships is to craft your message carefully. Nothing is worse, when you’re busy, than receiving an email from someone whose thoughts are incomplete or you cannot figure out what the intended message is because of all the typos and misspellings. Ultimately, what ends up happening is that the message doesn’t get through; the you are just too busy to spend time deciphering the garbled mess. If you send a poorly thought-out email, the recipient realizes that you should know better, and that maybe you’re not as smart or savvy as they thought.

However, if you post to a blog or message board, millions of people won’t get your message, they’ll just think you’re not that bright, undermining your credibility and on-line presence, and that’s not what we want to do.

How ’bout it?

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Explore posts in the same categories: networking, relationship economy, social networking, Web2.0

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